About 

I have been a Licenced Massage Therapist since 2006 and have been helping clients in Van Buren Co already for a couple years.  I grew up here locally and can answer most questions you may have about massage. I also own an Aframe rental bording Lacey State Park close to Lake Sugema.  I look forward to meeting and adding clients with a goal to provide  them and you with excellent body work,  the most rejuvenating experience for your mind, your body and your spirit so your whole self is in balance and if you need a relaxing place to stay check out  Keo Cabins below.

 

http://www.keocabins.com         Keo-Cabins

 

Located on Iris Trail, Van Buren Co. Iowa. With a goal to provide you with the most 

rejuvenating experience for your mind, your body and your spirit so your whole self is in balance.

 

Keosauqua is a natural place to come and unwind it has a timelessness to it. Come to the Villages and discover all that is Iowa. Laid out in 1839 the word Keosauqua derives from the Meskwaki and Sauk name for the Des Moines River, "Ke-o-saw-qua", which literally translates as "Bend in the River". The Hotel Manning, a three story relic from the Des Moines River's steamboat days, is Keosauqua's most notable landmark. Also located in Keosauqua are many other notable historic sites. The 1847 Pearson House was a stop on the underground railroad.

The Honey War was fought south of Keosauqua in what is now Lacey-Keosauqua State Park. Lacey-Keosauqua is one of the largest state parks in Iowa and was built by the Civil Conservation Corps during the Great Depression. Keosauqua hosts its annual Fall Festival the second full weekend in October.

Massage involves working and acting on the body with pressure – structured, unstructured, stationary, or moving – tension, motion, or vibration, done manually or with mechanical aids. Massage can be applied with the hands, fingers, elbows, knees, forearm, feet, or a massage device. Massage can promote relaxation and well-being,can be a recreational activity.

The word comes from the French massage "friction of kneading", or from Arabic massage meaning "to touch, feel" or from Latin massa meaning "mass, dough",cf. Greek verb μάσσω (massō) "to handle, touch, to work with the hands, to knead dough". In distinction the ancient Greek word for massage was anatripsis, and the Latin was frictio.

In professional settings massage clients are treated while lying on a massage table, sitting in a massage chair, or lying on a mat on the floor, while in amateur settings a general purpose surface like a bed or floor is more common. Aquatic massage and bodywork is performed with recipients submersed or floating in a warm-water therapy pool. The massage subject may be fully or partially clothed or unclothed.

 

Research done by the American Massage Therapy Association, as of 2012 in the United States there are between 280,000 and 320,000 massage therapists and massage school students. As of 2011, there were more than 300 accredited massage schools and programs in the United States. Most states have licensing requirements that must be met before a practitioner can use the title "massage therapist", and some states and municipalities require a license to practice any form of massage. If a state does not have any massage laws then a practitioner need not apply for a license with the state. However, the 

practitioner will need to check whether any local or county laws cover massage therapy. Training programs in the US are typically 500–1000 hours in length, and can award a certificate, diploma, or degree depending on the particular school. There are around 1,300 programs training massage therapists in the country and study will often include anatomy and physiology, kinesiology, massage techniques, first aidand CPR, business, ethical and legal issues, and hands on practice along with continuing education requirements if regulated. The Commission on Massage Therapy Accreditation (COMTA) is one of the organizations that works with massage schools in the U.S. and currently (Aug 2012) there are approximately 300 schools that are accredited through this agency.

Forty-three states, the District of Columbia and five Canadian provinces currently offer some type of credential to professionals in the massage and bodywork field---usually licensure, certification or registration. Thirty-eight states and the District of Columbia require some type of licensing for massage therapists.  In the US, 39 states use the National Certification Board for Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork's certification program as a basis for granting licenses either by rule or statute. The National Board grants the designation Nationally Certified in Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork (NCTMB). There are two tests available and one can become certified through a portfolio process with equivalent training and experience. Between 10% and 20% of towns or counties regulate the profession. The National Certification offered by the NCBTMB does not mean that you can practice massage in any state. 

In the US, licensure is the highest level of regulation and this restricts anyone without a license from practicing massage therapy or by calling themselves that protected title. Certification allows only those who meet certain educational criteria to use the protected title and registration only requires a listing of therapists who apply and meet an educational requirement.  It is important to note that a massage therapist may be certified, but not licensed. Licensing requirements vary per state, and often require additional criteria be met in addition to attending an accredited massage therapy school and passing a required state specified exam (basically the certification requirements in many states). In the US, most certifications are locally based. However, as of March 2014, some states still do not require a license or a certification.[citation needed]However, this is thought to change eventually as more regulatory bodies governing the profession of massage are established in each state. Furthermore, some states allow license reciprocity where massage therapists who relocate can relatively easily obtain a license in their new state. Not all states provide this option.

In late 2007, the Federation of State Massage Therapy Boards launched a new certification exam titled the MBLEx. Currently, 40 states have accepted this certification exam, along with the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands.

In 1997 there were an estimated 114 million visits to massage therapists in the US.  Massage therapy is the most used type of alternative medicine in hospitals in the United States. Between July 2010 and July 2011 roughly 38 million adult Americans (18 percent) had a massage at least once.

People state that they use massage because they believe that it relieves pain from musculoskeletal injuries and other causes of pain, reduces stress and enhances relaxation, rehabilitates sports injuries, decreases feelings of anxiety and depression, and increases general well being.

In a poll of 25- to 35-year-olds, 79% said they would like their health insurance plan to cover massage.  Companies that offer massage to their employees include Allstate, Best Buy, Cisco Systems, FedEx, Gannett(publisher of USA Today), General Electric, Google, Hewlett-Packard, Home Depot, JC Penney, Kimberly-Clark, Texas Instruments, and Yahoo!. In 2006 Duke University Health System opened up a center to integrate medical disciplines with CAM disciplines such as massage therapy and acupuncture. There were 15,500 spas in the United States in 2007 with about a third of the visitors being men.

The number of visits rose from 91 million in 1999 to 136 million in 2003, generating a revenue that equals $11 billion. Job outlook for massage therapists is also projected to grow at 20% between 2010 and 2020 by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, or 

faster than average.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Massage

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